National District Export Council

Working for America's Exporters™

Message from the Chair

Welcome to the National DEC Web Site!
 
Our web site is constantly undergoing improvements and updates that makes it easier for you to find the information you need about us and our activities including our members, committees, events, and other important information. Our updates include listings of local DEC events from around the country and links to other trade information resources. Take a moment to look around and explore our web site, including our About page if you are a first time visitor. You can also click on the DEC Locator to find the District Export Council in your area. The mission of the National DEC includes Working for America's Exporters. Our web site is a critical part of that mission.

User login

Third Annual International Trade Symposium

The National District Export Council, in conjunction with the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, hosted its Third Annual International Trade Symposium on November 20, 2015, in Washington, D.C. The Symposium covered current trade issues related to the Trans-Atlantic Trade & Investment Partnership, the Trans-Pacific Partnership and the U.S. Export-Import Bank.
 
Pictured above discussing the Trans-Pacific Partnership are Roy Paulson, National DEC Chair Emeritus and President, Paulson Manufacturing Corporation; Jim Fatheree, Executive Director, Japan and Korea, U.S. Chamber of Commerce; Drew Quinn, Deputy Lead Negotiator for the TPP, Office of the U.S. Trade Representative; Maureen Halstead, Georgia DEC Chair and Director, Global Product Management, KaMin, LLC; and Susanne Stirling, National DEC Member and Vice President, International Affairs, California Chamber of Commerce.

2015 DEC of the Year Award

Congratulations to the Louisiana DEC for winning the 2015 DEC of the Year Award! The award was presented by the U.S. Department of Commerce at the 2015 National DEC Forum.
 
Pictured above are Holly Vineyard, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Global Markets, U.S. Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration; Alta Baker, Louisiana DEC Chair; and Brittany Banta, International Trade Specialist, U.S. Commercial Service.

How to Think about the TPP

By: Simon Lester, CATO Institute
November 9. 2015
 
The full text of the Trans Pacific Partnership agreement was released last Thursday.  At over 6,000 pages (by most estimates – I haven’t counted them myself!), it’s quite a challenge to digest.  It’s easy to pick out obscure technical issues and discuss them with trade experts; it’s harder to talk about the big picture significance for a mass audience. 
 
Economist Jeffrey Sachs tried to do this in an op-ed in the Boston Globe, and I think he offered a good starting point:
 
The agreement, with its 30 chapters, is really four complex deals in one. The first is a free-trade deal among the signatories. That part could be signed today. Tariff rates would come down to zero; quotas would drop; trade would expand; and protectionism would be held at bay. The second is a set of regulatory standards for trade. Most of these are useful, requiring that regulations that limit trade should be based on evidence, not on political whims or hidden protectionism. The third is a set of regulations governing investor rights, intellectual property, and regulations in key service sectors, including financial services, telecommunications, e-commerce, and pharmaceuticals. These chapters are a mix of the good, the bad, and the ugly. Their common denominator is that they enshrine the power of corporate capital above all other parts of society, including labor and even governments. The fourth is a set of standards on labor and environment that purport to advance the cause of social fairness and environmental sustainability. But the agreements are thin, unenforceable, and generally unimaginative. For example, climate change is not even mentioned, much less addressed boldly and creatively.
 

Trans-Pacific Partnership Is about More than Lower Tariffs

By: Simon Lester, CATO Institute
Date: Sunday, October 18, 2015
  
On October 5, 2015, after an intense few days of negotiations, government officials from the United States and 11 other Pacific region countries announced the conclusion of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), a trade deal involving countries making up almost 40 percent of the world’s gross domestic product. Specific details of the agreement are still lacking, but by any measure this deal will be one of the largest in history. However, the work is not done yet.
 
The next step will be an intense political debate here in the U.S. as well as the other TPP countries. In preparation, it is useful to understand what’s in the TPP to sort out the wide-ranging impact it will have. Trade agreements are not just about lower tariffs — they are broad exercises in global governance.
 
The core feature of trade liberalization is still present, of course. In this regard, the key questions for evaluating the deal are, how much liberalization will occur through the TPP, and how quickly?
 
On various sensitive products, the early reports are underwhelming. We have heard that U.S. tariffs on cars and trucks will be reduced slowly (30 years for trucks); and U.S. restrictions on sugar will fall only slightly. Japan will liberalize agricultural markets only a little, and Canada will do the same on dairy imports. For those who favor trade liberalization, the specific details of “market access” provided for these and other products will matter a lot when assessing the merits of the deal.
 

Top Nine Myths About Trade Promotion Authority And The Trans-Pacific Partnership

By: Scott Lincicome, CATO Institute
Source: thefederalist.com/2015/06/09/top-nine-myths-about-trade-promotion-authority-and-the-trans-pacific-partnership/
The current debate over Trade Promotion Authority proves, once again, that the classic description of the anti-globalization movement—as “largely the well-intentioned but ill-informed being led around by the ill-intentioned and well informed”—still holds true. Despite the tireless efforts of trade policy experts to explain why TPA and the U.S. trade agreements it’s intended to facilitate are, while imperfect, not a secret corporatist plot to usurp the U.S. Constitution and install global government, myths and half-truths continue to infect traditional and social media outlets.

Business and Agricultural Leaders Comment on Senate TPA Vote



May 14, 2015
            
Washington D.C. – The Trade Benefits America Coalition, a broad-based group of more than 260 leading U.S. business and agricultural associations and companies, issued the following statement on a Senate vote to start debate on Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) legislation:
 
“We commend the Senate for voting to begin debate on the bipartisan TPA-2015 legislation that would help the United States secure the best possible trade agreements to benefit America’s businesses, farmers, and workers,” said David Thomas, President of the Trade Benefits America Coalition. “This bipartisan TPA legislation is critical to help open markets for American-made goods and services and level the playing field with our foreign competitors. We hope the Senate will have a constructive debate and pass this important legislation as soon as possible.” 
 
For more information on the importance of passing the TPA-2015 legislation to help support U.S. growth and jobs, visit www.tradebenefitsamerica.org.
 
The Trade Benefits America Coalition includes a wide range of associations and companies that are dedicated to the pursuit of U.S. international trade agreements that benefit American businesses, farmers, workers, and consumers. The Coalition believes that passage of modernized Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) legislation is important to help ensure America continues to benefit from trade.

Putting Congress in Charge on Trade

By: Paul Ryan and Ted Cruz
Wall Street Journal
April 21, 2015
A container ship and cranes at the Port of Los Angeles. Photo: Getty Images/Glowimages
 
The United States is making headway on two historic trade agreements, one with 11 countries on the Pacific Rim and another with America’s friends in Europe. These two agreements alone would mean greater access to a billion customers for American manufacturers, farmers and ranchers.
 
But before the U.S. can complete the agreements, Congress needs to strengthen the country’s bargaining position by establishing trade-promotion authority, also known as TPA, which is an arrangement between Congress and the president for negotiating and considering trade agreements. In short, TPA is what U.S. negotiators need to win a fair deal for the American worker.
 
There is a lot at stake. One in five American jobs depends on trade, and that share is only going to grow. Ninety-six percent of the world’s customers are outside the U.S. To create more jobs here, America needs to sell more goods and services over there. When that happens, the American worker benefits. Manufacturing jobs tied to trade pay 16% more on average, according to a study released by the independent U.S. International Trade Commission.
 

Time to Pass Trade Promotion Authority

By: Roy Paulson, Chair, National District Export Council
 
The upcoming congressional debate over Trade Promotion Authority gives our elected officials in Washington the chance to create new opportunities and open new markets for American small businesses around the world. I, along with millions of other small-business owners, hope they succeed and pass this critical legislation.
 
My support for TPA is simple to understand. I firmly believe increasing U.S. exports results in increased economic growth and job creation in America. TPA has been essential in negotiating trade agreements that help small businesses like ours sell into markets around the globe. Renewing the TPA agreement will help the U.S. negotiate pending agreements that will open even more foreign markets to the U.S., which will give American workers new markets in which they can more easily sell the goods and services they produce.
 
Recent free trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia and Panama broke down restrictive and stifling barriers to trade with those countries. The lowered tariffs allowed me to offer products at significantly more competitive prices to a new customer base. The countries involved in the new trade agreements promise even greater benefits due to the size and impact of their global markets.
 

Export-Import Bank of United States: A Valuable Tool and Partner For Manufacturers

 
How Ex-Im Bank works was featured on the Manufacturing Council of the Inland Empire’s show, “Manufacturers Corner (the show was hosted by Roy Paulson, CEO of Paulson Manfacturing, Inc. and the Chair of the National District Export Council). To view the video, go to youtu.be/hI9_-l7ijTA.
 
The international market represents a huge opportunity for small manufacturers. The Export-Import Bank of the United States last year alone helped small manufacturers secure $16.6 billion in financing to enable American entrepreneurs compete abroad, win more business and turn direct and indirect export opportunities into real sales.
 
Emerging markets overseas represent a huge, but risky, opportunity for small manufacturers. Many have found the Export-Import Bank of the United States (Ex-Im Bank) can help reduce the risk and increase the chances of success. Last year alone, Ex-Im Bank helped small manufacturers secure $16.6 billion in financing to enable American entrepreneurs compete abroad, win more business and turn direct and indirect export opportunities into real sales, said the Regional Director of Ex-Im Bank of United States Western Region, Sandra Donzella.
 
Ex-Im Bank is the official export credit agency of the U.S. Its mission is to assist in financing the export of U.S. goods and services to international markets. “The main message our agency likes to give is to use Ex-Im Bank to tap into the resources that we offer to help you compete, and win business internationally while making sure you get paid,” Donzella said in an interview on the Manufacturing Council of the Inland Empire’s show, “Manufacturers Corner.”
 

North Texas DEC Member Discusses the Little-Noticed Role of Trade in Small Business Success

 
As a new Congress settles in, members of both parties have identified trade as a prime area for bipartisan cooperation. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.), House Speaker John Boehner (-Ohio), and President Obama—in his State of the Union address last night—have all called for renewal of Trade Promotion Authority (TPA), which gives Congress a stronger role in U.S. trade negotiations.
 
While many think trade is the domain of big business, 98 percent of the 300,000 American companies that export are small and medium-sized businesses. These firms account for one-third of U.S. merchandise exports, according to the U.S. Department of Commerce. The number of small and mid-sized companies that export has nearly tripled over the past two decades.
 
Consider Dallas-based Chem-Crete International. Founded in 1969, it manufactures a permanent, environmentally safe, user-friendly and economical liquid waterproofing material for the concrete industry. Why does trade matter to Chem-Crete or to our country?
 
“In a word,” said Chem-Crete President and CEO Radi Al-Rashed, “it comes down to jobs.” Chem-Crete has expanded its global reach to the point that it now exports its products to more than 85 countries, and it now employs 20 workers.
 
However, small businesses often find the playing field for trade isn’t level. While the U.S. market is generally open, exports face foreign tariffs that often soar into double digits as well as a thicket of non-tariff barriers.
 

Pages